Fetal islet xenotransplantation in rodents and primates
Author(s)
Mandel, TE;
Details
Publication Year 1999-01, Volume 77, Issue #1, Page 155-160
Journal Title
JOURNAL OF MOLECULAR MEDICINE-JMM
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
beta cell replacement in IDDM by transplantation of either isolated adult islets of Langerhans or of proliferating immature islet tissue from fetal pancreas are potential ways of curing this disease. Because of the dearth of human cadaver donors adult allogeneic islets are scarce and in most Western societies availability of human fetal tissue of suitable maturity is also uncommon. The use of xenogeneic islets from domestic species already widely used for human consumption, e.g. pigs, could overcome this scarcity but xenogeneic tissues are faced with major problems of graft rejection. Hyperacute rejection (HAR) is the main cause of destruction of immediately vascularised xenografts and is caused by the interaction of natural cross-reactive antibodies with donor endothelial cells. Neovascularized islet grafts do not have donor EC as the target for HAR and are not subjected to this problem but are still acutely rejected. The mechanism of this destruction is still poorly understood but is clearly T cell dependent. However, current immunosuppression that is usually adequate for control of allograft rejection generally does not prevent xenograft rejection. A better understanding of the ways in which xenoantigens are recognised and of the nature of the immune response they initiate is fundamental to the development of appropriate strategies for the safe and effective control of xenograft rejection. The studies summarized herein describe the response of mice and primates to a challenge with fetal pig pancreas grafts, The rejection response that develops is different from that seen against a challenge with fetal allogeneic islets. Although the xenograft response is highly T cell dependent the actual effecters of graft damage appear to be different from those that provoke allograft destruction and include macrophages and granulocytes, particularly eosinophils, and possibly non-classical T cells.
Publisher
SPRINGER VERLAG
Keywords
RENAL-ALLOGRAFT REJECTION; DIABETIC NOD MICE; T-CELLS; XENOGRAFT REJECTION; INSULIN-SECRETION; PIG PANCREAS; TRANSPLANTATION; EOSINOPHIL; SURVIVAL; INTERLEUKIN-4
Rights Notice
Refer to copyright notice on published article.


Creation Date: 1999-01-01 12:00:00
Last Modified: 0001-01-01 12:00:00
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