Minimal Association of Common Red Blood Cell Polymorphisms with Plasmodium falciparum Infection and Uncomplicated Malaria in Papua New Guinean School Children
Details
Publication Year 2010-10, Volume 83, Issue #4, Page 828-833
Journal Title
AMERICAN JOURNAL OF TROPICAL MEDICINE AND HYGIENE
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Southeast Asian ovalocytosis (SAO), alpha(+)-thalassemia, and low expression of complement receptor 1 (CR1) have been associated with protection against severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria. In a cohort of children 5-14 years of age the effect of alpha(+)-thalassemia, SAO (SLC4AI Delta 27), CR1 polymorphisms, and Gerbich negativity (GYPC Delta ex3) on risk of P. falciparum infections and uncomplicated illness were evaluated. The risk of acquiring polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-diagnosed P falciparum infections was significantly lower for alpha(+)-thalassemia heterozygotes (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.56) and homozygotes (HR: 0.51) than wild-type children. No such differences were seen in light of microscopy diagnosed infections (P = 0.71) or were alpha(+)-thalassemia genotypes associated with a reduced risk of uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria. No significant associations between the risk of P. falciparum infection or illness were observed for any of the other red blood cell polymorphisms (P > 0.2). This suggests that these polymorphisms are not associated with significant protection against P. falciparum blood-stage infection or uncomplicated malaria in school-aged children.
Publisher
AMER SOC TROP MED & HYGIENE
Keywords
SOUTHEAST-ASIAN OVALOCYTOSIS; CEREBRAL MALARIA; GLYCOPHORIN-C; ERYTHROCYTE INVASION; ALPHA-THALASSEMIA; PCR DIAGNOSIS; ENDEMIC AREA; ALPHA(+)-THALASSEMIA; BAND-3; PROTECTION
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Creation Date: 2010-10-01 12:00:00
Last Modified: 0001-01-01 12:00:00
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