In vivo excitation of nanoparticles using luminescent bacteria
Details
Publication Year 2012-06-05, Volume 109, Issue #23, Page 8890-8895
Journal Title
PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
The lux operon derived from Photorhabdus luminescens incorporated into bacterial genomes, elicits the production of biological chemiluminescence typically centered on 490 nm. The light-producing bacteria are widely used for in vivo bioluminescence imaging. However, in living samples, a common difficulty is the presence of blue-green absorbers such as hemoglobin. Here we report a characterization of fluorescence by unbound excitation from luminescence, a phenomenon that exploits radiating luminescence to excite nearby fluorophores by epifluorescence. We show that photons from bioluminescent bacteria radiate over mesoscopic distances and induce a red-shifted fluorescent emission from appropriate fluorophores in a manner distinct from bioluminescence resonance energy transfer. Our results characterizing fluorescence by unbound excitation from luminescence, both in vitro and in vivo, demonstrate how the resulting blue-to-red wavelength shift is both necessary and sufficient to yield contrast enhancement revealing mesoscopic proximity of luminescent and fluorescent probes in the context of living biological tissues.
Publisher
NATL ACAD SCIENCES
Keywords
REPORTER-GENE-EXPRESSION; ENERGY-TRANSFER; BIOLUMINESCENCE; LUCIFERASE; MICROSCOPY; BIOLOGY; FRET; BRET
WEHI Research Division(s)
Systems Biology And Personalised Medicine
Rights Notice
Copyright © 2013 National Academy of Sciences.


Creation Date: 2012-06-05 12:00:00
Last Modified: 0001-01-01 12:00:00
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