Genome Sequencing and Analysis of the Tasmanian Devil and Its Transmissible Cancer
Details
Publication Year 2012-02-17, Volume 148, Issue #4, Page 780-791
Journal Title
CELL
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii), the largest marsupial carnivore, is endangered due to a transmissible facial cancer spread by direct transfer of living cancer cells through biting. Here we describe the sequencing, assembly, and annotation of the Tasmanian devil genome and whole-genome sequences for two geographically distant subclones of the cancer. Genomic analysis suggests that the cancer first arose from a female Tasmanian devil and that the clone has subsequently genetically diverged during its spread across Tasmania. The devil cancer genome contains more than 17,000 somatic base substitution mutations and bears the imprint of a distinct mutational process. Genotyping of somatic mutations in 104 geographically and temporally distributed Tasmanian devil tumors reveals the pattern of evolution and spread of this parasitic clonal lineage, with evidence of a selective sweep in one geographical area and persistence of parallel lineages in other populations.
Publisher
CELL PRESS
Keywords
FACIAL-TUMOR DISEASE; SARCOPHILUS-HARRISII; EVOLUTION; DIVERSITY; PATTERNS; ORIGINS; DFTD
WEHI Research Division(s)
Bioinformatics
Rights Notice
opyright © 2012 ELL & Excerpta Medica. This document may be redistributed and reused, subject to certain conditions. This document was posted here by permission of the publisher. At the time of the deposit, it included all changes made during peer review, copy editing, and publishing. The U. S. National Library of Medicine is responsible for all links within the document and for incorporating any publisher-supplied amendments or retractions issued subsequently. The published journal article, guaranteed to be such by Elsevier, is available for free, on ScienceDirect, at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cell.2011.11.065


Creation Date: 2012-02-17 12:00:00
Last Modified: 0001-01-01 12:00:00
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